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Author archive for: mhannah@uoregon.edu

DH Monday Edition

Posted in DH Blog

By Matthew Hannah and Heidi Kaufman

We had a delightful workshop on network analysis using Palladio. Our next DH event will take place on May 20th, 2-4 p.m., in Hedco 146 (note the room change) and will feature a panel of scholars talking about incorporating digital tools into their teaching. We will hear from Tara Fickle (English), Emily Simnitt (English), Julie Sykes (Romance Languages), and Jim Tice (Architecture) about how they implement digital tools into their teaching and assignments. We anticipate a robust conversation and, as always, will offer coffee and snacks courtesy of the Oregon Humanities Center. We hope you will join us!

We are also planning to hold another workshop on R, a powerful and free programming language and environment in which many humanists have become increasingly interested. Unlike our last R workshop, this one will be offered to new users who have no experience using R. We will be meeting on May 24th, in Hedco 142, from 3-5 p.m. (RSVP HERE).

To prepare for our workshop on the R environment, we wanted to discuss the role of what’s been called “Big Data” in humanities scholarship. We will discuss the idea broadly in our Monday post and return to it more specifically on Thursday. Big data, loosely defined by Wikipedia, is the concept of sets of data that are so large and complex that they require complex analytic tools to analyze. An example of such big data might be the millions of syllabi that have been collected on the Open Syllabus Project or the visualizations generated from the digital materials held at the New York Public Library. Although big data are usually found more in non-humanities sectors and feature much larger datasets, humanists have increasingly become interested in the role big data can play in cultural analysis. What happens when we can read 30,000 books at the same time? Can we analyze such abstract concepts as style or sentiment in a more concrete way using computers? Can we better understand historical trends in culture and literature when we look at the bigger picture? Read MoreDH Monday Edition

DH Monday Edition

Posted in DH Blog

By Matthew Hannah and Heidi Kaufman

Happy Monday! Mark your calendars for our exciting upcoming events in DH. We will be holding a workshop on social network analysis using Palladio tomorrow, from 3-5 p.m, in McKenzie 375, RSVP.

We are also featuring the third in our Digital Humanities Spring Events Series, “Digital Classroom Exercises,” which will be meeting on May 20th, from 2-4, in Hedco 146 (Note the unusual room). We will enjoy snacks and coffee and discuss some great digital tools that faculty at Oregon are implementing into their classrooms. Please join us for both events!

For the next several Monday posts, we will be focusing on a series of discussions that have been taking place in The Los Angeles Review of Books over the past few months. LARB has interviewed many of the prominent theorists and practitioners in DH, including controversial critiques of DH. We will discuss each of these interviews and position them within the more local context here at Oregon. Read MoreDH Monday Edition